Folksonomies: Why do we need controlled vocabulary?

Noruzi, Alireza Folksonomies: Why do we need controlled vocabulary? Webology, 2007, vol. 4, n. 2. [Journal article (Unpaginated, i.e., html or from an issue unpaginated)]

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English abstract

The Web consists of diverse information collections in terms of the type of content, context, format and quality. However, this diversity, as good as it is, often brings challenges for users in their web information seeking activities. The technologies such as wiki, blog, RSS, and folksonomy that build Web 2.0 present an opportunity to share knowledge and facilitate interactions between users and computers. One of the main challenges of Web 1.0 was that users were not engaged in information organization. Currently folksonomy-based systems (e.g., Del.icio.us) engage users in bookmarking and introducing their favorites.

Item type: Journal article (Unpaginated, i.e., html or from an issue unpaginated)
Keywords: Web 2.0, Folksonomy, Knowledge Organization, Classification, Thesaurus
Subjects: I. Information treatment for information services > IC. Index languages, processes and schemes.
I. Information treatment for information services > ID. Knowledge representation.
H. Information sources, supports, channels. > HQ. Web pages.
L. Information technology and library technology > LS. Search engines.
L. Information technology and library technology > LC. Internet, including WWW.
Depositing user: Dr. Alireza Noruzi
Date deposited: 25 Aug 2007
Last modified: 12 Mar 2019 15:14
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10760/10308

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