Net Neutrality: A Library Issue

Greyson, Devon Net Neutrality: A Library Issue. Feliciter, 2010, vol. 56, n. 2, pp. 57-59. [Journal article (Print/Paginated)]

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English abstract

Net neutrality is a critical component of equitable access to information and freedom of expression. While Canada has recently made some progress toward enshrining principles of net neutrality in our telecommunications regulations, the status quo does not guarantee protection of consumers from unnecessary “traffic management” on the part of ISPs. Librarians and library associations in Canada and the U.S. have advocated for net neutrality as part of their goal of protecting intellectual freedom, and such efforts must continue until net neutrality is assured.

Item type: Journal article (Print/Paginated)
Keywords: Net neutrality, network neutrality, telecommunications policy, library advocacy, Canada
Subjects: L. Information technology and library technology. > LA. Telecommunications.
E. Publishing and legal issues. > EE. Intellectual freedom.
A. Theoretical and general aspects of libraries and information. > AB. Information theory and library theory.
Depositing user: Devon Greyson
Date deposited: 22 Apr 2010
Last modified: 02 Oct 2014 12:16
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10760/14494

References

"SEEK" links will first look for possible matches inside E-LIS and query Google Scholar if no results are found.

1. Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, “Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-657: Review of the Internet Traffic Management Practices of Internet Service Providers.” http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2009/2009-657.htm (accessed January 12, 2010).

2. Greg Meckbach, “Canada Weighs in with Net Neutrality Ruling,” PC World, Oct 21, 2009, http://www.pcworld.com/article/174062/canada_weighs_in_with_net_neutrality_ruling.html (accessed January 7, 2010).

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3. Steve Anderson, Angus Calls Out Clement on Net Neutrality. SaveOurNet.Ca. http://saveournet.ca/content/angus-calls-out-clement-open-internet-net-neutrality (accessed January 11, 2010).

4. Canadian Library Association, “Statement on Intellectual Freedom.” http://www.cla.ca/Content/NavigationMenu/Resources/PositionStatements/Statement_on_Intell.htm (accessed January 14, 2010).

5. British Columbia Library Association, “British Columbia Library Association – Resolutions”. http://www.bcla.bc.ca/IPC/page/resolutions.aspx (accessed January 7, 2010).

6. Canadian Library Association, “Canadian Library Association AGM 2008”. http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=AGM_2008 (accessed 1/7/2010, 2010).

7. Mike Godwin, Issue Brief: A Library Perspective on Network Neutrality: (American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy, 2006), http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/offices/oitp/publications/issuebriefs/A%20Library%20Perspectiv.pdf (accessed January 7, 2010).

8. American Library Association, “ALA: FCC's Consideration of Net Neutrality Principles Key to Preserving Free Internet,” press release , October 22, 2009, http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/news/pressreleases2009/october2009/freeinternet_wo.cfm (accessed January 7, 2010).

9. American Library Association, news post on “FTC Cautions Against Net Neutrality Legislation,” American Libraries Current News weblog, news posted June 29, 2007, http://www.ala.org/ala/alonline/currentnews/newsarchive/2007/june2007/netneutrality.cfm (accessed January 7, 2010).

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10. Lauren Barack, “School Librarians Weigh in on Net Neutrality,” School Library Journal’s Extra Helping, October 26, 2009. http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6703810.html (accessed 1/7/2010).

11. Norman Oder, “Obama Administration Supports Net Neutrality,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, September 22, 2009, http://www.libraryjournal.com/eNewsletter/CA6698686/2673.html (accessed 1/7/2010).


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