The Prevalence and Practices of Academic Library Journal Clubs

Young, Philip and Vilelle, Luke The Prevalence and Practices of Academic Library Journal Clubs., 2011 [Preprint]

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English abstract

An increasing number of references to journal clubs in library literature, and the recent creation of clubs at the authors’ institutions, sparked curiosity about how widespread journal clubs are in academic libraries. An online survey announced on library listservs assessed their prevalence and practices. Library journal clubs seem to be a relatively recent phenomenon, and are more widespread than previously thought, though not pervasive. Library journal clubs promote current awareness, analysis skills, group cohesion, and intra-library knowledge, and offer a low-cost professional development opportunity in times of budget difficulties. Practices that sustain journal clubs can maintain these benefits.

Item type: Preprint
Keywords: journal clubs, reading groups, discussion groups, academic libraries, continuing education, professional development, current literature
Subjects: G. Industry, profession and education. > GE. Staff.
G. Industry, profession and education. > GH. Education.
G. Industry, profession and education. > GI. Training.
Depositing user: Philip Young
Date deposited: 13 Apr 2011
Last modified: 17 Dec 2012 15:50
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10760/15531

References

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1. Jill Laster, “Report measures librarians’ time reading job-related materials”, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Available: http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Report-Measures-Librarians/21641 (March 5, 2010).

2. Eugene Barsky, “A library journal club as a tool for current awareness and open communication: University of British Columbia case study”, Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, vol. 4, no. 2 (2009).

3. Nicola Pearce-Smith, “A journal club is an effective tool for assisting librarians in the practice of evidence-based librarianship: a case study”, Health Information and Libraries Journal, 23, p. 32-40, 2006.

4. Y. Deenadayalan, K. Grimmer-Somers, M. Prior, and S. Kumar, “How to run an effective journal club: a systematic review”, Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 14 (2008), 898-911.

5. Richard S. Klein and Rose Slowinski, “Chicago Medical Library Journal Club,” Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, 64(3) (July 1976) : 320.

6. Medical Library Association, “Discussion Group Program,” Available: http://www.mlanet.org/education/discussiongroups

7. Brenda L. Seago, Lynne U. Turman, Andrea S. Horne, Philip Croom, Karen Cary, “Journal club with a mission”, Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, 82:1 (January 1994) : 73-74.

8. A.C. Tomlin, “From dowdy to dandy: spiffing up the journal club”, One-Person Library, 12:12 (1996): 1-3.

9. Liz Doney and Wendy Stanton, “Facilitating evidence-based librarianship: a UK experience”, Health Information and Libraries Journal, 20 (Suppl. 1), (2003): 76-78.

10. Pearce-Smith, “A journal club is an effective tool for assisting librarians in the practice of evidence-based librarianship”, pp. 33-34.

11. Booth, A. and A. Brice. “Clear-cut? Facilitating health librarians to use information research in practice,” Health Information and Libraries Journal, 2003, 20 (suppl. 1), 45-52.

12. David Herron and Lotta Haglund, “Wrestling with the appraisal and production of evidence- and the winner is… !” , 4th International Evidence Based Library & Information Practice Conference, May 6-11, 2007, Chapel Hill, NC, Available: http://www.eblip4.unc.edu/papers/Haglund.pdf

13. Denise Koufogiannakis, Marlene Dorgan and Ellen Crumley, “Facilitating evidence-based librarianship: a Canadian experience”, Health Information and Libraries Journal, 20, suppl. 1 (2003): 73-75.

14. Theodore Hickman and Lisa Allen, “A librarians journal club: a forum for sharing ideas and experiences”, C&RL News 66:9 (October 2005) : 642-644.

15. Elizabeth W. Kraemer, “Keeping up with the journals: a library journal club at Oakland University”, The Journal of Academic Librarianship 33:1 (2006): 136-137.

16. Barsky, “A library journal club as a tool for current awareness and open communication.”

17. Scott Stebelman, “Taking control of continuing education: the formation of a reading group at George Washington University”, The Journal of Academic Librarianship, (September 1996): 382-385.

18. Pearce-Smith, “A journal club is an effective tool for assisting librarians in the practice of evidence-based librarianship”, p. 39.

19. Doney and Stanton, “Facilitating evidence-based librarianship”, p. 76.

20. Hickman and Allen, “A librarians journal club”, p. 643.

21. Ibid., p. 642.

22. Pearce-Smith, “A journal club is an effective tool for assisting librarians in the practice of evidence-based librarianship”, p. 33.

23. Deenadayalan et al., “How to run an effective journal club”, p. 902.

24. Kraemer, “Keeping up with the journals”, p. 137.


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