Are Library and Information Science Journals Becoming More Internationalized? A Longitudinal Study of Authors' Geographical Affiliations in 20 LIS Journals from 1981 to 2003

Sin, Sei-Ching Joanna Are Library and Information Science Journals Becoming More Internationalized? A Longitudinal Study of Authors' Geographical Affiliations in 20 LIS Journals from 1981 to 2003., 2005 . In 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST), Charlotte (US), 28 October - 2 November 2005. [Conference paper]

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English abstract

This paper examines journal publications in the field of library and information science (LIS) to assess the level of internationalization in their publications authorship pattern. The international production and communication of scholarly knowledge is crucial to the growth of a discipline. Recent advancement in communication technology and the rise of globalization have led to the hope of a more balanced flow of scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, scholars also cautioned the possibility of a global digital divide and a widening knowledge gap. This study analyzed the geographical affiliations of authors in 20 international LIS journals to track the longitudinal changes in LIS authorship pattern. Findings suggest an increase in the internationalization of LIS authorships over the years. However, the LIS authorship distribution was still highly uneven in 2003 (Gini coefficient = 0.95). Economic power is still found to be a moderate predictor of publication performance. The findings of this study suggest that, at the moment of the writing, there is still room for the LIS field to be more internationalized. Further research is needed to identify the barriers in international scholarly communication and to explore the implications of such a communication pattern on scientific development and global equality.

Item type: Conference paper
Keywords: international authors ; periodicals ; globalization ; acess to information
Subjects: A. Theoretical and general aspects of libraries and information. > AA. Library and information science as a field.
E. Publishing and legal issues. > EZ. None of these, but in this section.
H. Information sources, supports, channels. > HA. Periodicals, Newspapers.
B. Information use and sociology of information > BG. Information dissemination and diffusion.
Depositing user: Norm Medeiros
Date deposited: 10 Mar 2006
Last modified: 02 Oct 2014 12:02
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10760/7004

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